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Child Centered Divorce
The caring support you need if you're a parent who's facing ... going through ... or moving on after divorce!
  - Divorce and Co-Parenting
  - Parenting Children of Divorce
  - Dating as a Divorced Parent
Created by Rosalind Sedacca, CDC
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5 Ways To Help Your Kids Genuinely Thriv...

5 Ways To Help Your Kids Genuinely Thrive After Your Divorce!
By Rosalind Sedacca, CDC How do you know your kids are managing well after your divorce? As a divorced parent you owe it to your children to diligently watch their behavior. And listen to their conversations. In addition, to be aware of any changes that may be due to challenges related to the divorce. Children can adapt well to life after divorce. But it’s up to you to catch signs they may be confused, anxious, insecure or in other ways having problems coping with their new reality. Here are 5 vitally important ways to know your children are doing well, and thriving, despite your divorce: They continue to thrive at school When school grades fall or aggressive behavior develops, parents need to be proactive and not wait on the sidelines. Conversations with teachers and school counselors can give you a better perspective on your child’s needs. Don’t hesitate to talk

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How Parental Anger Affects Your Children...

How Parental Anger Affects Your Children – During & Long After Divorce!
By Rosalind Sedacca, CDC Children have a difficult time understanding what your anger means.  They may experience shock, disbelief, fear, guilt, grief, confusion, shame and outrage by your aggressive tendencies.  Observe how your behavior is affecting the children in your home and realize that you are a major role model for them. It is very likely that your children will grow to imitate your behavior and reactions – even if they disapprove of it at this time. Adults are responsible for helping children learn appropriate behaviors and coping skills.  Without positive guidance children may experience the following behavior patterns resulting from your anger issues: Physical aggression towards others such as hitting, harming, screaming, kicking, etc. Sleep problems Feelings of inadequacy Increased fears, especially about losing a parent through divorce Depression/sadness School behavior problems Stomach aches, headaches, nausea and other stress-related physical symptoms Feeling their home is no longer a safe

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Proving Sobriety With Soberlink

Proving Sobriety With Soberlink
By Rosalind Sedacca, CDC Since its inception in 2011, Soberlink has been a leader in monitoring blood alcohol content for Family Law, Addiction Treatment, and Workplace Compliance. The remote breathalyzer, utilizing facial recognition technology similar to that on your phone, ensures the test-taker's identity and sends immediate results to specified contacts. This not only proves sobriety but also offers peace of mind to all concerned parties. Additionally, the device is equipped with smart technology to detect any attempts to deceive the test, ensuring the integrity of the results. Embracing Convenience, Speed, and Reliability Soberlink's alcohol monitoring is not punitive but rather a tool designed to ensure the wellbeing of both parents and children. Soberlink simplifies the process of remote alcohol testing, offering convenience, speed, and reliability—especially in custody and alcohol-related cases. The system’s Advanced Reporting feature uses AI to generates easy-to-understand testing reports, as well, so Family Law professionals and

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Answers To Divorced Parents Questions Ab...

Answers To Divorced Parents Questions About Holiday Season Challenges
By Rosalind Sedacca, CDC What makes the holiday season so challenging for parents considering divorce, moving through the process or transitioning after divorce?  Memories of the past. So many difficult emotions come up. It’s frightening to think of what lies ahead when a marriage breaks apart. It’s hard to face the differences in our life, especially all the unknowns looming ahead. For many, there’s a the challenge of facing lonliness versus being alone and content. Be aware of what you are telling yourself. Expectations set us up for disappointment. When we focus on the past and make comparisons, that’s when we feel the pain and sadness more acutely. Feeling powerless adds to the pain and frustration. How does your mindset, beliefs and expectations impact your holiday experience? Our attitude influences how we handle any challenge. We need to understand that change is natural in life. Accepting change is essential for

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When Children of Divorce Act Out – Carin

When Children of Divorce Act Out – Caring Parents Step Up!
By Rosalind Sedacca CDC Divorce, like life, is rarely neat and packaged. This is especially true for divorcing parents. The reality of divorce comes with challenges. Unexpected twists, constant frustrations and times of utter helplessness when children act out or pull away. Here are three important tips for coping and responding when your children are venting or lashing out. Or perhaps, expressing their own frustrations about being caught up in a family adjusting to separation or divorce. 1. Diffuse blame Some children, especially pre-teens and teens, may blame one parent or the other for the divorce. Sometimes they may be correct in this interpretation. Especially under situations  they have been aware of for years (alcoholism, absent parent, domestic violence, etc.). Other times they side with one parent as a result of their prior relationship dynamics with that parent. Regardless of why you or your spouse are blamed, keep your cool.

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Teens Taking Sides A Painful Consequence...

Teens Taking Sides A Painful Consequence of Divorce
By Rosalind Sedacca, CDC I received the following question which poses many challenges related to divorce and parenting. While there is never a one-size-fits-all answer to relationship questions, I’m sharing my response with you as a perspective worth considering. This may be useful to initiate conversations with your former spouse and children or for discussion with a therapist or divorce coach if you are seeing one. I am divorced for a short while, after being separated for several years. My 16-year-old daughter is awful to me and she yells "I hate you" and even curses at me even in public. I am sure she blames me for leaving her mom, but my other two children (boys, one older and one younger) seem to be dealing with the divorce fine. My problem is that I have no control over discipline. I would never speak to anyone the way she speaks to

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Talk “To” – Not “At” – Your Child … Thro

Talk “To” – Not “At” – Your Child … Through Divorce and Beyond
By Rosalind Sedacca, CDC Most parents don't know how to talk to their children. It's one of the underlying reasons for parent-child communication, respect and trust issues within the family dynamic. You wouldn't think one would need to be reminded to talk to your children. Unfortunately, many parents need just such a reminder -- especially in today's mega-paced culture in which just sitting down to a family dinner together seems to be a major accomplishment.  Too often busy parents find themselves talking "at" their children, but not "to" them. And most especially, not "with" them. This, of course, is problematic in any family trying to raise socially, emotionally and spiritually healthy children. However, it is especially dangerous if that family is facing the challenges of divorce or separation.  If your parent-child communication skills and rapport is not optimal before discussions about divorce or family lifestyle changes come up, the likeliness

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Divorce and Parenting: Teaching Valuable...

Divorce and Parenting: Teaching Valuable Life Lessons to Your Children
Communication with your child is essential. By Rosalind Sedacca, CDC As a divorced parent, what lessons and behaviors are you modeling for your children? The messages you convey will influence your children into adulthood. Here's valuable advice on leaving a positive imprint on the children you love! Bad things can happen to good people. Divorce is a prime example.  Good people get divorced. Responsible people who are loving parents get caught in the decision to end a loveless or deceitful marriage. The consequences of that decision can either be life affirming or destroying, depending upon how each parent approaches this transition. Parents who are blinded by blame and anger are not likely to learn much through the experience. They see their former spouse as the total problem in their life and are convinced that getting rid of that problem through divorce will bring ultimate resolution. These

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Divorced Parents: Never “Guilt” Your Kid

Divorced Parents: Never “Guilt” Your Kids For Loving Their Other Parent!
By Rosalind Sedacca, CDC We all know that one of the biggest divorced parent “don’ts” is putting down or disrespecting your children’s other parent to them. Clearly, while it’s tempting to badmouth your co-parcoment for the way they’ve hurt you in the marriage, venting to the kids puts them in a very uncomfortable position. They love both of their parents and don’t want to hear from you about the ways your ex misbehaved or initiated your divorce. There’s another element in this conversation that doesn’t get as much attention – but certainly needs to be addressed. And that’s the “guilt factor.” It’s based on your forbidding or discouraging your children from expressing love or talking about their other parent around you. Kids naturally want to talk about their lives. They like to share things they might have done with their other parent, especially the fun times. Very often our expressions,

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5 Keys To Help Your Kids Transition Betw...

5 Keys To Help Your Kids Transition Between Post-Divorce Homes
By Rosalind Sedacca, CDC Parenting plans and contact schedules are an important part of divorce proceedings. They help create a semblance of routine in this new chapter of family life for divorcing parents. And for the children  you love. I am a strong believer in co-parenting whenever possible to serve the best interest of your children. But not all couples can work together with civility and harmony. So sometimes parallel parenting becomes the plan. That usually translates into you both parent the children but with minimum communication between one another. Keep in mind that your kids pick up on the emotional energy around their parents. It's no surprise that life after divorce is smoother and easier when both parents behave maturely and responsibly.   However you work out your shared parenting plan, it’s the day-to-day challenges of post-divorce life that puts all co-parents to the test. Here are 5 important

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